Monday, March 2, 2015

Making Sense of Clothing Metaphors:

Different characters employ clothing metaphors at various times in the play. What are some examples of this? And what purpose do clothing metaphors serve for Shakespeare's development of theme?

-Oakridge Fifth Period

4 comments:

  1. Shakespeare mentions clothing metaphors many times throughout the play. On the morning after killing King Duncan, Macduff vows to never see Macbeth be crowned. He states, "Well, may you see things well done there: adieu! / Lest our old robes sit easier than our new!"(2.4.37-38). This is saying the old robes were King Duncan's, and the new are Macbeth's. Another instance where a clothing metaphor is used is in Act I Scene III, where Banquo says, "New honors come upon him, / Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mould / But with the aid of use." (1.3.144-146). Banquo is here saying that Macbeth's new title as "Thane of Cowdor" doesn't quite fit him. Clothing metaphors go throughout the entire play. Its purpose is to show that Macbeth's character is taking off his old clothes, ones that made him subject to Lady Macbeth and lesser than King Duncan, and doing whatever it takes to put on the clothes of a King. But unfortunately for Macbeth, the King's clothes don't fit.

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    1. This is Jess Ford, but I was logged into my dad's account.

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    2. This is Jess Ford, but I was logged into my dad's account.

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  2. Shakespeare mentions clothing metaphors many times throughout the play. On the morning after killing King Duncan, Macduff vows to never see Macbeth be crowned. He states, "Well, may you see things well done there: adieu! / Lest our old robes sit easier than our new!"(2.4.37-38). This is saying the old robes were King Duncan's, and the new are Macbeth's. Another instance where a clothing metaphor is used is in Act I Scene III, where Banquo says, "New honors come upon him, / Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mould / But with the aid of use." (1.3.144-146). Banquo is here saying that Macbeth's new title as "Thane of Cowdor" doesn't quite fit him. Clothing metaphors go throughout the entire play. Its purpose is to show that Macbeth's character is taking off his old clothes, ones that made him subject to Lady Macbeth and lesser than King Duncan, and doing whatever it takes to put on the clothes of a King. But unfortunately for Macbeth, the King's clothes don't fit.

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